Home Health Women’s Health and Wellness

Women’s Health and Wellness

We asked local experts about topics that affect women. Read on for information about issues you may experience as you age.

Women’s Health and Wellness

A Wrinkle with Time
By Allison K. Arthur, MD, Sand Lake Dermatology Center

How wrinkled our skin becomes as we age depends on many factors, such as history of sun exposure, smoking, skin tone, and genetics. Dynamic wrinkles, like crow’s feet around the eyes and scowl lines between the eyebrows, are created by repeated facial expressions. Some larger wrinkles, such as the folds around the nose and mouth, become accentuated as we lose facial fat in the cheeks, leading to sagging skin.

For people who have not yet developed wrinkles, the best ways to prevent them include minimizing sun exposure, wearing sunscreen and moisturizer daily, and using a topical retinoid at bedtime. Individuals who make exaggerated facial expressions may consider starting Botox injections to relax muscles before etched-in lines appear.

Once wrinkles are present, there are a variety of options to rejuvenate the skin. Laser treatments can help to smooth the surface of the skin. Dermal fillers such as Juvederm and Restylane plump the skin. Facial peels and products with alpha hydroxy acids exfoliate the skin and improve texture. Skin care products containing growth factors, antioxidants, peptides, as well as retinoids, can also help with texture and minimize fine lines. A personalized plan for rejuvenation should be created for each person, taking into account one’s medical history, skin type, lifestyle, and goals for treatment outcomes.

Taking No Chances

Most college seniors are focused on passing exams and prepping for careers. But Taylor Bivin, 24, had a different experience. During her final semester at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, genetic testing revealed she carried the BRCA2 gene mutation, putting her at a higher risk of breast cancer than most women.

Taylor tried to put the test results out of her mind, but she couldn’t. In the end, she opted for a bilateral prophylactic mastectomy with breast reconstruction to ward off the risk.

“Five to 10 percent of breast cancers are hereditary,” says Rhonda Harmon, MD, a surgeon who practices at Florida Hospital Orlando. “Currently it is thought that 45 percent of women who inherit the abnormal BRCA2 mutation will develop breast cancer by the age of 70.”

A mastectomy isn’t the right solution for everyone, Dr. Harmon adds. For those who favor a more conservative approach, close surveillance is an option. It involves diagnostic mammography alternated with breast MRI every six months.

For Taylor, having the surgery was not a difficult decision. DzBeing able to take your future into your own hands is a powerful thing.

Fibromyalgia: A Starting Point for Managing Pain
By Nimesh Dayal, M.D., MRCP, MSc, Health Central Hospital

Dr. Nimesh Dayal, a board-certified rheumatologist, is originally from Johannesburg, South Africa. He received his medical degree from the University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. He did his internal medicine training at the Royal College of Physicians and The Reading Hospital and Medical Center in Pennsylvania. He was a post doctorate clinical research Fellow in rheumatology at Northwestern University in Chicago and completed his training in clinical rheumatology at Emory School of Medicine in Atlanta. Dr. Dayal is board certified in internal medicine and rheumatology and has presented at regional and national scientific meetings of the American College of Rheumatology.

Dr. Dayal as published in peer reviewed journals. He has extensive experience in clinical research and has been an investigator in numerous clinical trials. He is currently involved in clinical research and studying various therapeutic options for patients with rheumatoid arthritis, gout, osteoarthritis and systemic lupus erythematous.

Beyond his medical career Dr. Dayal has also undertaken part in charity work mostly through his involvement in BAPS charities. He enjoys traveling, reading and English Premier League.

Irritable Bowel Syndrome
By Maryam Kashi, DO, Florida Hospital East Orlando

Although Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) affects both sexes, women are affected twice as often as men. IBS is characterized by abdominal pain in association with change in bowel habit. Only 15% of patients with IBS actually seek medical care, however, it may impact their lives daily, resulting in lost work and school days. The course of IBS is often waxing and waning; severe events can lead patients to seek care in emergency rooms.

Abdominal pain is usually described as crampy in nature. It may be affected by food, stress or bowel movement. Patients have differing bowel habits, such as diarrhea, constipation or both. IBS patients often also experience abdominal bloating, nausea and gas. However, alarm signs such as bleeding, weight loss and nocturnal symptoms should not be mistaken for IBS and should prompt urgent medical attention. Treatment for IBS is essentially centered around specific symptoms. It is important to ensure that other conditions, such peptic ulcer disease, inflammatory bowel disease, celiac disease, biliary/pancreas diseases, have been excluded. In addition to various medications that may help with the symptoms of IBS, dietary modifications may also be helpful. Discussion about these issues should
always begin with a primary care physician; however, if needed specialty care with a gastroenterologist may be necessary.

Unsightly Veins can lead to Unhealthy Legs
By Samuel P. Martin, MD, Vascular Vein Centers

Many suffer from unsightly spider veins and varicose veins. Vein disease symptoms can range from mild discomfort to pain, but they all have one thing in common: ignoring them allows the problem to progress. Some common symptoms and signs of vein disease include: Fullness, aching, pressure or fatigue, swelling, particularly at the ankle, cramping, and itching with rough scaly skin at the ankle. Even spider veins, while considered cosmetic, could be the tip of the iceberg and indicate deeper vein problems.

Over time, untreated vein disease leads to bigger issues which become progressively more damaging including; lower leg swelling, especially at the end of the day, skin changes in texture thickness and color in the lower leg and eventually the risk of ulcers around the ankle.

Fortunately, with the use of laser therapy and foam sclerotherapy, vein problems can be treated in a clinic setting using local anesthesia , avoiding painful surgery. This is particularly important for those who can’t take time off work or interrupt busy schedules. You can resume normal activities after the procedures. Leg health is significantly enhanced by wearing graduated compression stockings, hose or leggings especially for those who are on their feet much of the day. Vein health equates to leg health and an active lifestyle.

Botox for Migraine Treatment
Many suffer from unsightly spider veins and varicose veins. Vein disease symptoms can range from mild discomfort to pain, but they all have one thing in common: ignoring them allows the problem to progress. Some common symptoms and signs of vein disease include: Fullness, aching, pressure or fatigue, swelling, particularly at the ankle, cramping, and itching with rough scaly skin at the ankle. Even spider veins, while considered cosmetic, could be the tip of the iceberg and indicate deeper vein problems.

Over time, untreated vein disease leads to bigger issues which become progressively more damaging including; lower leg swelling, especially at the end of the day, skin changes in texture thickness and color in the lower leg and eventually the risk of ulcers around the ankle.

Fortunately, with the use of laser therapy and foam sclerotherapy, vein problems can be treated in a clinic setting using local anesthesia, avoiding painful surgery. This is particularly important for those who can’t take time off work or interrupt busy schedules. You can resume normal activities after the procedures. Leg health is significantly enhanced by wearing graduated compression stockings, hose or leggings especially for those who are on their feet much of the day. Vein health equates to leg health and an active lifestyle.

Comments

Lyndsay Fogarty Lyndsay Fogarty has had many roles at Central Florida Lifestyle, working her way from intern to contributing writer to managing editor. She is a graduate of the University of Central Florida’s Nicholson School of Communication where she earned her degree in journalism. Along the way, she has learned that teamwork and dedication to your craft will get you far, and a positive outlook on the present will get you even farther.

Pin It on Pinterest

Share This

Share this post with your friends!

X